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Monday, 03 October 2005

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Rich Puchalsky

Hey, Henry commented here recently in response to my interminable Gene Wolfe thread. And John Crowley showed up on The Valve, China Mieville did a long piece on Crooked Timber. You see, if only everyone just wrote about science fiction...

With that in mind, more Zizek. Here's the end of his LRB article, does it remind you of anything?

"In the revolutionary explosion, another utopian dimension shines through, that of universal emancipation, which is in fact the ‘excess’ betrayed by the market reality that takes over on the morning after. This excess is not simply abolished or dismissed as irrelevant, but is, as it were, transposed into the virtual state, as a dream waiting to be realised."

Yes, it's Mieville's _Iron Council_ train! More to follow at some possible future time.

Scott Eric Kaufman

I don't know if you watch South Park, but in the classic episode "Lemmiwinks" (which you can watch, in its entirety, here) the boys are forced to attend "The Death Camp of Tolerance." While there, the brown-shirted black-boots with German accents who run the camp force them to make macaroni pictures of people of all races and creeds holding hands under rainbows. When the boys finish, the "counsellors" destroy them and the kids have to start all over. Only faster! Eventually, one of the kids--the kind, sweet-hearted Butters--can't keep up, and the "counsellors" rip him from his seat and pull him across the floor. Beneath the whimpers you can hear him saying, repeatedly, "No. More. Arts and Crafts. No. More. Arts and Crafts."

That's how I feel. Except about Zizek.

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