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Tuesday, 09 May 2006

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Pierce Nahigyan

I'd read it. Not only for the personal enjoyment and literary illumination I would be sure to find therein, but also to bear silent witness to the further genesis of such beautific words as 'researchical.'

Pierce Nahigyan

Removing my foot from my mouth for a moment I'd like to add that 'researchical' would probably be a beatific event, and not beautific which, unbeknownst to me, isn't even really a word.

However, let the record show that it should be.

Adam Roberts

Take it from me: writing books is a doddle. Why, I've written one just now, whilst simultaneously typing in this comment.

Scott McLemee

It would be bard to beat "Professor Office Sex" as a title. Hell, I'd buy it. Or request a review copy anyway.

How did we ever get along without the word "researchial"?

Mike S

Researchically, Scott's book is sure to dazzle.

To be honest, your book idea sounds boring. ("Life as a Semi-Deaf Person"?). Why not write fiction, or better yet a thriller inspired by your blog experiences? How about this: one night you have a particularly nasty exchange with an Internet troll. The troll finds out where you live and, while you're teaching a Lit J class, abducts your wife. Then you and your academic friends must turn amateur sleuths in order to find her. So you go on the road with an angry Irishman who picks fights with everyone, and a Sikh who's shocked both by mainstream American ignorance of all things Indian and more specifically Punjabian, and even more repelled by granola-eaters who think they're culturally enlightened because they listen to Cornershop. The true horror of your novel could emerge when it turns out that the troll is not acting alone, but is linked to a shadowy anarchist organization inspired by the writings of an obscure Slovenian philosopher, a disciple of Friedrich Nietzsche and Georges Sorel. The book would conclude with the rationalist scholar-detectives entering the halls of Chicago's Divinity School, where you find out a close friend is not a friend at all. Your semi-deafness could then be a key element in the denouement, but it wouldn't be the basis for the whole book. (Maybe a final twist could be that your wife wasn't abducted at all, but that she, herself, is the leader of the secret organization. The last paragraph could have the terrifying millenial apparition of Cthulhu or Excess or King Arthur or whatever.)

Well, I think it's a good idea.

Jason

Am I going to be in it? Can I be the guy from Nantucket?

Scott Eric Kaufman

Comment notification? Who needs that? Sorry for going all absentee on you, but I didn't realize you existed.

Yes, Jason, you'll have a bit part in my drama...unless you fork over some of that cash money I love so much.

Mr. Anonymous, you're absolutely right: next to that, a literary journalistic take on my life sounds positively dull. But, as per the LJ usual, I hope that the quality of the writing will mask the real lack of narrative oomph.

Adam, you make me throw up a little in my own mouth sometimes. How do you write so much?

Mike and Pierce, many thanks for the votes of confidence, and also for the love on my parallelism. I was at a loss--as I've been quite frequently of late, pace tonight's post--and just went with it. You too, Scott. (Do I get a kickback on the review copy? 'Cause if not, no dice. Alright, one die, but that's it.)

Ray Davis

Inspiration's cheap when someone else has to do the work. I'm delighted you're going with the idea.

Mr. Anon, go with your idea, too. Plenty of room for both.

(Occasionally back when she was alive and not talked about in academic circles, I'd daydream about writing a critical biography of Patricia Highsmith but it would always turn into a plotline where a biographer and his subject become stalkers of each other and at least one ends up murdered....)

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