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Saturday, 24 January 2009

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tomemos

Not to be a downer, but mightn't there be some copyright issues with putting the entire Killing Joke online? But then I guess DC is probably pretty relaxed about that kind of thing.

Ahistoricality

I read it in a comic book shop. Frankly, most of my comic book reading was standing up in comic book shops until I started collecting Sandman, and got lucky on some used Batmans.

Chuck

Funny, as part of our service obligations here at FSU, I may be asked to go to local high schools to talk about film studies, and I had a similar idea of using TDK to teach some basic film vocabulary (low-key lighting, depth of field, etc). This is a really helpful post.

JPool

I'm curious, given range of visual effects available these days, as to why you're treating the technical aspects of cinematography as part of the visual composition. Certainly, what Nolan and his cenmatographer (looking...Wally Pfister) were able to achieve was impressive, even if the resulting combination of John Woo and Sidney Lumet didn't always work for me. It's interesting and could be a good way to hook students with the how'd-they-do-that factor, but it seems incidental to the question of the end result of the framed visuals themselves.

Scott Eric Kaufman

I've put stuff up before, Tom, and the worst that's happened is they've asked me to take it down. Thing is, the biggest comic pirate out there is Warren Ellis. Doesn't make it right, but if I hook someone one Alan Moore, DC and all the other companies he despises makes money.

Ahistoricality, I didn't even have to stand. I did a lot of baseball card trading when I was young, and so I'd park it in the baseball card/comic book shop and read just about everything as it came in. Funny, I always used to look forward to the day the new books came in, but I can't remember what day it was anymore. (By "funny," I obviously mean, "Damn, but I'm old.")

Chuck, I suppose that counts as a tacit approval of the content of the post. I was worried I'd, well, just plain punted some of it and was doing my students a disservice.

JPool, the class I'm teaching aims to teach rhetoric, and last quarter I did do my students a disservice the way I taught Batman Begins. Their arguments tended to address the content of the film, not how that content was communicated. This is intended to give them a basic vocabulary, a foundation on which they can build specific, closely "read" arguments about how a director achieves a certain effect on the audience. As I've taught myself the past few weeks, learning how difficult (and expensive) some effects are to achieve provides a new appreciation for the status of directorial intent.

Scott Eric Kaufman

(Also, the folksiness of my comment is a direct result of my having just watched Waitress.) (Which I liked, despite its saccharin folksiness.)

tomemos

"I've put stuff up before, Tom, and the worst that's happened is they've asked me to take it down."

I figured. Just yanking your chain.

In all honesty, though, I'd love it if you called me by by nom de plume when I use it.

Ahistoricality

I did a lot of baseball card trading when I was young...

I did a lot of procrastination in grad school, myself. As a kid, I mostly read Doonesbury and Peanuts collections, and the odd Pogo. Plus the daily comics. Our local rag just went to a "cost effective" comics page including Broom Hilda, Little Orphan Annie, Alley Oop, Dick Tracy (the first day I saw that lineup I really did laugh out loud. Not so much since) and knockoffs of three or four more contemporary strips. So I'm considering that subscription to ucomics now.

Cyrus

Funny, I always used to look forward to the day the new books came in, but I can't remember what day it was anymore. (By "funny," I obviously mean, "Damn, but I'm old.")

It was Wednesday when I was in college, at the end of the day. The place wasn't welcoming enough that I could just sit down and read without demonstrating an intention to buy, but most Thursday afternoons I walked over there after my last class (or, at least one semester, before something or other in the evening). Back before college, I think new comic day was Wednesday too, but I too am getting old and can't say for sure.

Alexandra.F

thanks so much this has really helped with my media essay on the dark knight. "brilliant work".
HI CLASS

XP HAHAHAHAHHAHAH

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