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Thursday, 12 March 2009

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Minivet

Wait, never mind. I can't really make out the posters, assumed you were talking about the opera depicted. Sorry.

SEK

Don't you "wait, never mind" me when you're correct. Shows you how much I know about opera.

StevenAttewell

I think that's a bit strong, SEK. A tiny, background detail of an opera indicates sinning in his heart? I think it's a rather clever detail.

JPRS

So what you're saying is, a movie failed to live up to the book? Wow, that is unusual. I'd devote two or three more blog posts to that one.

Vance Maverick

And take these in the context of the credit sequence as a whole -- structured as a series of giant unmissable references. The bat-details here are microscopic in comparison, for fanboys and makars only.

SEK

I think that's a bit strong, SEK. A tiny, background detail of an opera indicates sinning in his heart? I think it's a rather clever detail.

I suppose I take it just another brick in the wall of Snyder's over-literal fanboy obsessiveness. Says nothing in itself, but added to the evidence presented in the other post, it becomes significant. Another way to say this would be:

Yes, it's clever, but it's only clever.

Minivet

Don't mind me, I was suddenly overcome with doubt that I could have caught SEK in such a basic error.

Adam Roberts

"I mentioned ... the idea of pirate comics, reasoning that a world with real superheroes would have no need of them in comics."

I'm trying to get my head around the logic of this. As it might be: '... a world with real wars would have no use for war comics'; or 'a world with real weedy men and pneumatic women living in it would have no use for Robert Crumb.'

SEK

I'm trying to get my head around the logic of this.

Don't ask me to explain your countrymen to you, Adam, as it seems they love something called "brisket."

Adam Roberts

According to this, it's especially popular 'in the Southern States of the USA'. And with that, the pingpongball comes hurtling back at you, over the net.

SEK

And with that, the pingpongball comes hurtling back at you, over the net.

You mean "bowled," don't you?

Adam Roberts

You can't properly bowl a pingpongbowl. No seam, you see.

Josh

it seems they love something called "brisket."

I always knew you were a self-hating Jew.

Josh

Hey, Other Josh: he's talking about "brisket," which is a fixture of barbecues as well as of Jewish cuisine. Not bris kit, an exclusively Jewish tool which a mohel carries with him.

Avram

Except that Hollis Mason establishes (in Under the Hood) that he'd read a Superman comic, so we know that superhero comics did exist at some point in the Watchmen continuity. The first issue of Bat-Man came out in 1939; the pirate comics essay at the end of Chapter 5 says that pirate stories didn't come to dominate the medium until the end of the 1950s. That gives a two-decade range during which that opening shot could be set, and if it's the opening shot, that implies it comes early.

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