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Thursday, 28 January 2010

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amadeupfakename

I can see his and your point. Zinn really got me into history. You could almost say it was the gateway drug into my obsession with the field. I have my MA in the field and maybe some day I will go get my Phd if this library thing I am pursuing is not suited to me. Yes there are better in the field but he is still my favorite. I know that's not the most "scholarly" thing to say but whatever.

It is kind of the same thing that Jello Biafra says when people tell him that he changed their lives. That it is now your turn to do the same for someone else.

Jesse A.

Interesting. The role of Zinn in your intellectual development in many ways mirrors the role Ayn Rand plays for many on the right (I include myself). Though there are obvious differences (certainly in self image, I can't imagine her ever reacting so humbly to a young admirer), they both have sort of crude worldviews, expressed powerfully in ways that challenge authority in exactly the sort of way that appeals to young people.

Paul Renault

I'm with Zinn: You should also find out what music your favorite musicians listen to, what their muses are. What films directors watch, or are inspired by. What their sources are.

And learn to be a sociopath. http://www.ribbonfarm.com/2009/11/21/morality-compassion-and-the-sociopath/

JPRS

Howard Zinn is like Ayn Rand? That's like saying Isaac Asimov is like L. Ron Hubbard...

asarwate

A is always like B if you squint hard enough. That's the trouble with analogies.

Nate

Great post Scott. Have you ever read Eric Foner's The Story of American Freedom? Just curious.
take care,
Nate

painsthee

this? this is marvelous. and for that, thank you.

SEK

Nate, I have, years and years ago. The one I read most recently---though I can't, for the life of me, remember why---was Who Owns History.

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