My Photo

Categories

Roll Call

Become a Fan

« How the great and mighty dress themselves. | Main | The perils of Googling on the wall. »

Monday, 28 November 2011

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c2df453ef0154378c8e4a970c

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Just in case you need to bluff your way out of a war.:

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Jonkrow

Steven Moffat did comment once, I think on Dr Who Confidential, that yes the Doctor's main 'power' seems to be his ability to talk his way out of anything. AFAIK, the first person to use the Doctor's reputation as weapon in his arsenal was Kate Orman, in one of her 90s Doctor Who novels, Return of the Living Dad, but in a comedic mode - about a third of a large army of massed aliens just turn and run away as soon as they see him - he doesn't even have to threaten them, just rather passively make his presence known.

The 90s novels were somewhat influential on the post-2005 series, and this trope was picked up on by Moffat in Forest of the Dead where the 10th Doctor convinces the threat to give him time - interestingly to help them out as much as survive - based on his reputation alone.

This scene in The Pandorica Opens proves highly ironic, since the armada doesn't need to take the Pandorica from him at all - they put it there as an elaborate trap for him of which the Doctor at this point is unaware. It seems a reversal of the trope, and specifically of the scene in The Eleventh Hour. The Atraxi from that story are said to be part of the armada, and I always imagine the Daleks and Co having a good chuckle at the Doctor during his bluff in this scene.

SEK

Steven Moffat did comment once, I think on Dr Who Confidential, that yes the Doctor's main 'power' seems to be his ability to talk his way out of anything.

I got that, suddenly and unexpectedly, as I was teaching this. The whole season, the Doctor's constantly talking his way out trouble and/or talking to stall for time, but then I remembered what Amy said at her wedding in The Big Bang: "I found you. I found you in words just like you knew I would; that's why you told me the story, the brand new, ancient blue box. Oh clever, very clever." It's the words themselves that have the power, Moffat seems to be arguing.

It seems a reversal of the trope, and specifically of the scene in The Eleventh Hour. The Atraxi from that story are said to be part of the armada, and I always imagine the Daleks and Co having a good chuckle at the Doctor during his bluff in this scene.

Absolutely. My students actually picked up on a lot of the correspondences with and reversals of material from The Eleventh Hour. For example, that last frame up there, where I say he's gloating? He's striking his "WHO DA MAN?" pose, and even though he's not technically breaking his pledge to never saying that again, he's still striking the same pose. I'm not sure what to make of that detail, actually, as if the Doctor was reluctant not to break a promise he made to himself, but the correspondence is certainly there.

JimtheFish

I would say there is something else about the Doctor in this scene and that is the Doctor as Supervillain. You have compared The Doctor to Superman and that is a good contrast in many areas but if faced with a collection of his rogue's gallery of villainous space aliens(of which he does have a few) he would fly up into the upper atmosphere and begin kicking there butt all over the immediate vicinity. Which is why they would be hestitant to face the man in the first place unless they had a very good reason for doing so and some sort of plan of defeating him. Even so they would still be hestitant based on previous encounters.

All of this is in play in the scene at Stonehenge that you show except the Doctor is not going to start kicking the crud out of gathering. He has to use guile and his reputation to win the day. I seem to recall a story about two opposing Generals in China of many years ago who bitterly opposed each other as one always seemed to get the upper hand on the other. That second General finnaly caught his rival unawares with a vastly superior force and had him caught in a canyon with an acient temple. The first General though over the matter as he knew he could not win any physical battle against his opponent and instead opted to seat himself in plain view ontop of the temple with no other soldiers in sight. He was eated in his best outfit and looking all the world as if he was unconcerned about anything. The second General saw his rival atop the temple, he thought the matter over, and retreated his forces.

The first General's reputation and past history of winning was all it took to win a no win situation.

So let's look at a brief reversal. The Doctor as let's say Darkseid. Darkseid is a being that super-heroes will generally team up to confront. Green Arrow and Batman aren't going to start something on their own against Darkseid, they would gather the whole Justice League the entire reserves and few more besides, including Superman and put a plan together and with trepidation(excepting Superman) begin a campaign against Darkseid. All of these powerful races of beings who hate and fear the Doctor but are forced to confront him because of the state of the entire Universe.

Who wouldn't want to lock Darkseid in a box?

The comments to this entry are closed.